Jabin Baldwin Alexander, Jr. (4 Feb. 1853-9 Dec. 1882)

Jabin Baldwin Alexander, Jr., was born in Newbern, Virginia. He was the son of Jabin Baldwin Alexander (1821-1904), a farmer and merchant as well as a state legislator, and his wife, Virginia Hance (1813-1881). [Note: Alexander Senior was called “John B. Alexander” in the 1850 U.S. Census.—JLC]

Jabin B. Alexander Jr. received an appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, MD, but refused to take the test-oath. Also called the “iron-clad” oath, it was required of all federal employees, lawyers, and elected officials, and apparently, military officers and cadets. Impressed by Alexander’s reasoning, “Senator Johnson took the matter in hand and tried to have the youth admitted upon taking the proper constitutional oath. The law on the subject is imperative, and the Secretary of the Navy to-day informed Senator Johnson that Alexander could not be admitted to the academy as a cadet unless he subscribed to the iron-clad oath.” (“Appointment of a Cadet”) It is unclear whether the requirement was waived in Alexander’s case, or if he attended the Naval Academy.

Daily Dispatch (Richmond, VA)
27 June 1870
From VirginiaChronicle.com
Sponsored by the Library of Virginia

Here is the oath as passed by the 37th Congress in 1862:

I, A. B., do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I have never voluntarily borne arms against the United States since I have been a citizen thereof; that I have voluntarily given no aid, countenance, counsel, or encouragement to persons engaged in armed hostility thereto; that I have neither sought nor accepted nor attempted to exercise the functions of any office whatever, under any authority or pretended authority in hostility to the United States; that I have not yielded a voluntary support to any pretended government, authority, power or constitution within the United States, hostile or inimical thereto. And I do further swear (or affirm) that, to the best of my knowledge and ability, I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States, against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter, so help me God. (An Act to Prescribe an Oath of Office and for Other Purposes, p.502-503.)

Alexander attended the University of Virginia in sessions 48-49 (1871-1873), where he studied law.

In the 1880 U.S. Census, Alexander Jr. was married to Lillie A. Hance (b. ca. 1860), and had a daughter, Lilly M. Alexander, born 31 March 1880. The family was living with Mrs. Alexander’s parents in St. Louis, Missouri, and Alexander was employed as a carpenter.

Jabin B. Alexander Jr. died in December 1882, and was buried in the Alexander Cemetery in Pulaski County, VA. (Findagrave.com)

References:

  • Appointment of a cadet—he refuses to take the test-oath.” Richmond dispatch. (Richmond, Va.), 27 June 1870. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
  • Alexander tombstones, Alexander Cemetery, Pulaski County, VA. Findagrave.com (viewed 10-12-2013).
  • Schele de Vere, Maximilian. Students of the University of Virginia; a semi-centennial catalogue. Baltimore, MD, 1878.
  • “Telegraph News,” Alexandria Gazette, 1 April 1870, p.1.
  • “United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M8D2-39B : accessed 9 April 2016), Michael Alexander in household of John B Alexander, Pulaski county, part of, Pulaski, Virginia, United States; citing family 60, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • “United States Census, 1860,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M41Y-4K6 : accessed 9 April 2016), Michael Alexander in entry for Jabin B Alexander, 1860.
  • “United States Census, 1870,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MFG7-5N8 : accessed 9 April 2016), Jabin B Alexander in household of John B Alexander, Virginia, United States; citing p. 5, family 25, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 553,173.
  • “United States Census, 1880,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M6FR-C7R : accessed 22 March 2015), J B Alexander, St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States; citing enumeration district , sheet , NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll ; FHL microfilm .
  • “United States Census, 1880,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M6NH-TKV : accessed 22 March 2015), J B Alexander, St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States; citing enumeration district , sheet , NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll ; FHL microfilm .
  • “United States Census, 1880,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M6FR-C75 : accessed 22 March 2015), Lilla Alx Hanze in household of William Hanze, St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States; citing enumeration district , sheet , NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll ; FHL microfilm.
  • United States. Congress. Public Acts of the Thirty-Seventh Congress of the United States, second session. Chapter 128. An Act to prescribe an Oath of Office, and for other Purposes. July 2, 1862, p. 502-503..
  • “Virginia Births and Christenings, 1584-1917,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X5XH-132 : 5 December 2014), Lillie Alexander, 31 Mar 1880; citing Pulaski, Virginia, reference 121; FHL microfilm 2,046,959.
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Archer Family (Fauquier County, VA)

William B. Archer (21 Dec. 1814-between 28 Oct. and 31 Dec. 1847) was born in Richmond, VA. I believe him to be the son of Colonel William Archer (1780-1822) of Powhatan, and his wife, Charlotte Clarke, daughter of Major John Clarke of Keswick (“The Archer Family,” 19 May 1889).

Young Archer attended the University of Virginia in sessions 9-10 & 12 (1832-1834 & 1835-1836), earning a Bachelor of Law. (UVA Matriculation Books) In sessions 9 and 10, William B. Archer’s guardian was named as Major John Clarke, possibly his maternal grandfather.

On 12 Jan. 1837, Archer married Mary Marshall (1816-1878), a granddaughter of Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall. ([Wedding announcement], Richmond Enquirer) The couple had three children, Thomas Marshall, William Segar, and Elizabeth (“Lizzie”) Archer. Thomas later attended U.Va.

“William B. Archer and others announced in the Enquirer on December 8 [1846], their intention to organize a company in Richmond to consist of volunteers from the eastern counties which could not raise companies.” (Wallace, p. 49) William B. Archer, now a captain in Company I (the Marshall Guard) of the 1st Virginia Volunteers, and his men arrived in Mexico in early in 1847 to join General Zachary Taylor’s army. The Virginia Volunteers returned to Richmond in early August of 1848. (“Arrival of the Volunteers”)

In the year that they were in Mexico, many of the men and officers succumbed to disease. By 9 Aug. 1847, Captain Archer was back in Richmond, VA. From there, his doctor sent a letter to the War Department stating that Archer was too ill to return to active duty. Two months later, on 28 Oct. 1847, Archer wrote to the U.S. War Department—again from Richmond—saying that he was still too ill to return to duty. With that letter is a letter from Archer’s doctor stating that Captain Archer was “suffering from disordered bowels.” (Possibly a case of dysentery caught in the camp?) (Letters Received by the Office of the Adjutant General Main Series 1822-1860) In any case, Captain William B. Archer died sometime between 28 Oct. and 31 Dec. 1847.

Currently, I do not know where Captain Archer is buried. Mary Marshall Archer and two of the Archer children, William Segar Archer and Lizzie Archer, are buried in Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond. Thomas Marshall Archer is buried in Thornrose Cemetery, in Staunton, VA.

[Note: William B. Archer’s date of birth is taken from the UVA Matriculation Books, for sessions 10 and 12; in session 9, he gave the date of his birth as 29 Dec. 1814. I should also warn the researcher that there were several men named Archer in the ranks of the volunteers in the Mexican War, including one man also named William B. Archer who later settled in Illinois. In addition, there is a contemporary William S. Archer who served both in the Virginia House of Delegates and the United States Senate and House of Representatives.—JLC]

Thomas Marshall Archer (5 Oct. 1837-28 Nov. 1881) was from Fauquier County, VA, the son of William B. Archer (above) and his wife, Mary Marshall. He attended the University of Virginia in sessions 33-34 (1856-1858), and studied to be a lawyer.

T. Marshall Archer served in the Confederate army in the 38th Battalion of the Virginia Light Artillery (Fauquier Artillery) as a second lieutenant. He was wounded in August 1862 at Rappahannock Station, VA., and was wounded again at Plymouth, NC on 20 Apr. 1864. He was on sick leave until late December 1864, when he was assigned to light duty in Richmond, VA. He surrendered at Appomattox Court House, on 9 Apr. 1865.

Marshall Alexander

Record of T. Marshall Archer noting he had been paroled at Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865. From the Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Virginia.

After the war, T. Marshall Archer lived in Culpeper County, VA, where he was a lawyer. He was a representative to the Conference of Conservative Electors in 1872, representing Culpeper.

The following excerpt appeared in the Daily Dispatch on 13 Feb. 1878, 

The friends of Mr. T. Marshall Archer will be pleased to learn of his improved condition since he has been an inmate of the lunatic asylum at Staunton. His family have received a letter from one of the resident physicians of that institution to that effect, and giving encouragement to hope that he may ultimately be restored. He was adjudged a lunatic by a commission consisting of Mayor Stanard and Justices Alcocke and Nalis, upon the evidence of Drs. Rixey, Lewis, and Jeffries, and sent to the asylum about two weeks ago.

In 1881, he died in Staunton, Virginia, and was buried at the Thornrose Cemetery in that city. At this time, I do not know if he was married or had any children.

[Note: Thomas Archer’s birth date is from the UVA Matriculation Books. The death date of 28 Nov. 1881 is from Historical Data Systems. Archer’s tombstone in Thornrose Cemetery says he died on 5 Nov. 1881.—JLC]

References:

  • “The Archer Family,” part 1, The Critic (Richmond, Va.), 5 May 1889, p.3; part 2, The Critic (Richmond, Va.), 19 May 1889, p.3.
  • Archer tombstones, Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, VA & Thornrose Cemetery, Staunton, VA. Findagrave.com.
  • “Arrival of the Volunteers.” Richmond Enquirer (Richmond, VA), 8 August 1848, p. 4.
  • Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Virginia. Carded Records Showing Military Service of Soldiers Who Fought in Confederate Organizations , compiled 1903-1927, documenting the period 1861-1865, record group 109, reel 254.
  • “Culpeper County.” Daily Dispatch (Richmond, VA), 13 Feb. 1878, p.3.
  • Goode, George Brown. Virginia cousins; a study of the ancestry and posterity of John Goode of Whitby. Richmond, VA, 1887.
  • Historical Data Systems, Inc. “Thomas Marshall Archer,” in American Civil War Research Database [online].  copyright 1997-2016. http://www.civilwardata.com/active/hdsquery.dll?SoldierHistory?C&351972
  • Letters Received by the Office of the Adjutant General Main Series 1822-1860, in Letters Received, compiled 1805-1889. NARA M567. Unbound letters, with their enclosures, received by the Adjutant General, 1822-1860, roll 0331, file A194.
  • Paxton, W. M. The Marshall Family. Cincinnati, OH, 1885.
  • Robarts, William Hugh. Mexican War Veterans; a complete roster. Washington, D.C., 1887.
  • Schele de Vere, Maximilian. Students of the University of Virginia; a semi-centennial catalogue. Baltimore, MD, 1878.
  • Sorley, Merrow Egerton, comp. Lewis of Warner Hall; the history of a family. Baltimore, MD, 1979, p. 110-113.
  • “United States Civil War Soldiers Index, 1861-1865,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F926-T4Z : 4 December 2014), T. Marshall Archer, Sergeant, Company G, 49th Regiment, Virginia Infantry, Confederate; citing NARA microfilm publication M382 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 2; FHL microfilm 881,396.
  •  University of Virginia Matriculation Books, 1825-1904, Accession #RG-14/4/2.041, Special Collections Dept., University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.
  • “Virginia, Deaths and Burials, 1853-1912,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X5Y7-RMY : accessed 27 Nov 2014), Mary M Archer, 03 Jan 1878; citing Richmond City, Virginia, reference p 1 cn 1; FHL microfilm 2048592.
  • Virginia National Guard Historical Society, Inc. Preserving Virginia National Guard History. c2011 http://www.vnghs.org/styled-18/styled-25/index.html
  • Wallace, Lee A., Jr. “First Regiment of Virginia Volunteers 1846-1848.” Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, v.77, No. 1, Part One (Jan., 1969), pp. 46-77.
  • [Wedding announcement.] Richmond Enquirer (Richmond, VA), 19 Jan. 1837, p.3.

 

 

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John Adolphus Alexander (14 Feb. 1849-16 Feb. 1878)

John A. Alexander was the son of Josiah Alexander (1813-1892), a North Carolinian, and his first wife, Angeline Anthonet Burford (1830-1854). Josiah was one of the earliest settlers in what is now Perry County, Alabama.

On 1 Sep. 1861—at the age of 13!—John enlisted in the Confederate army for the length of the Civil War. He entered service as a private, and was a sergeant of Company D of the 20th Alabama Infantry Regiment by the end of the war. He was among those who were besieged in Vicksburg, Mississippi, and served as a nurse in “Hospital #1” there. His service jacket contains a signed parole from Vicksburg, signed 17 Jul. 1863, in which he swears not to take up arms again against the Union. However, his record contains documents that indicate he did return to service, including a receipt for clothing in 1864. In March 1865, he was furloughed for 60 days because of a diagnosis of “phthisis pulmonalis”—tuberculosis. About that same time he was wounded on duty.  In May 1865, he was recorded as a prisoner of war as a “straggler, Confederate States Army.” (U.S. Compiled Service Records)

John A. Alexander parole

Parole of John A. Alexander, 17 July, 1863. From Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Alabama, Record Group 109. 

John attended the University of Virginia in session 46 (1869-1870), where he studied history, Latin, and mathematics. In the 1870 U.S. Census, he was living on his father’s farm and is recorded as a “Farmer.” In 1878, John died and was buried in the Valley Creek Cemetery, Dallas County, Alabama. (Findagrave.com; Pomeroy) I have not been able to find a document giving the cause of his death, but will keep searching.

[Note: The tombstone gives his birth date as “Feb. 10, 1849” while the U.Va. Matriculation Books (in which the information is written by the students themselves) give his birth date as “14 February 1849.”–JLC]

References:

  • 1850-1900 U.S. Census. FamilySearch.org.
  • “Alabama State Census, 1855,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V6PB-W24 : 14 November 2014), J A Alexande, Perry, Alabama; citing p. 5, Department of Archives and History, Montgomery; FHL microfilm 1,686,107.
  • “Alabama State Census, 1866,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V6PY-JV2 : 14 November 2014), Josiah Alexander, Perry, Alabama; citing certificate 25747, p. 48, Department of Archives and History, Montgomery; FHL microfilm 1,533,835.
  • “Alabama Estate Files, 1830-1976,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VNTJ-TT7 : 12 December 2014), Josiah Alexander, 1892; citing Perry County courthouse, Alabama; FHL microfilm 2,114,393.
  • Alexander tombstones, Valley Creek Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Dallas, Alabama. Findagrave.com
  • McIntosh, Elise D., Email to Carol Elliott, 31 Aug. 2001, Re: John Sample Alexander, Dallas Co., AL, on Genealogy.com [Note: This name should be “James Sample Alexander.” — JLC] http://www.genealogy.com/forum/surnames/topics/alexander/6799/
  • Pomeroy, Kay & Jean Pickering. Valley Creek Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Dallas, Alabama [tombstone transcriptions]. 2003. http://files.usgwarchives.net/al/dallas/cemeteries/valleycreek.txt
  • United States. [Records of John A. Alexander] in Carded Records Showing Military Service of Soldiers Who Fought in Confederate Organizations , compiled 1903–1927, documenting the period 1861–1865 in Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Alabama. The National Archives, Record Group 109, Publication number M311, roll 0277.
  • University of Virginia Matriculation Books, 1825-1904, Accession #RG-14/4/2.041, Special Collections Dept., University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.
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Lewis Emanuel Texada (2 Aug. 1818-23 Aug. 1884)

L. E. Texada was the son of John Augustus (or Augustin) Texada, of Mississippi, and his wife, Lucy Welsh (1794-1845). “The first of the Texadas to immigrate from Castile, Spain, was Don Manuel Garcia de Texada, the father of John Augustus Texada,” who moved the family to Rapides Parish, Louisiana. “John operated Castile Plantation, which was later operated by his son Lewis.” (Atkinson) Lewis attended the University of Virginia in sessions 13-15 (1836-1839), and studied mathematics, moral philosophy, and law.

He returned to Rapides Parish in 1839, and in the same year, married his first wife, Annie B. Lyon (d. 1849) of Charlottesville, VA, who was an invalid. Upon his return to Louisiana, Lewis Texada was unable to set up a law practice due to the illness of his first wife, but became a planter.  

His second wife, whom he married in 1850, was Pleasance Hunter (1831-1913) of the neighboring Eden Plantation. The couple had 8 children: Lucy, Lewis Manuel, William T., John A., Henry Allen, Susan P., Margaret J., and Mary Ellen Texada. (1850-1910 U.S. Census)

[Note: On the 1860 Census, another child is listed as “Milley F.,” female, age 5. This child appears in none of the other censuses and may be a mistake on the enumerator’s and the indexer’s part, because this child is the correct age to be Willy T. or William T.—JLC] (1850-1910 U.S. Census)

Lewis was politically active in the Democratic Party. He was first elected to represent Rapides Parish in the Louisiana legislature in 1844, and throughout his life—both before and after the Civil War—he served several times in both the State Senate and House of Representatives. In 1861, he was elected as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention that took Louisiana out of the Union.  (Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Northwest Louisiana; Louisiana Democrat, 1884)

In August 1884, L. E. Texada died suddenly at his home, of heart disease. He is buried in the Texada Cemetery, in Rapides Parish, where Pleasance Texada and several of their children are also buried. (Findagrave.com; Louisiana Democrat, 1884)

[Note: On Mr. Texada’s tombstone, the birth date 2 Aug. 1819, is given.  The date of 2 Aug. 1818 is from the U.Va. Matriculation Book, in which the students themselves wrote their information.—JLC]

References:

  • 1850-1910 U.S. Federal Census. HeritageQuestOnline.com
  • Atkinson, Megan M., comp. “Biographical/Historical note,” in Finding aid to Texada Family Papers, Mss. 5119, Inventory. Louisiana State University Libraries, Baton Rouge, Louisiana State University, 2013, p.4. http://www.lib.lsu.edu/sites/default/files/sc/findaid/5119.pdf
  • Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Northwest Louisiana.  Nashville, TN, 1890, p. 594-595.
  • “Biographical/Historical note.” in Finding Aid to Lewis Texada And Family Papers, Mss. 2985, Inventory, Louisiana State University Libraries, Baton Rouge, Louisiana State University, 2015, p.4. http://www.lib.lsu.edu/sites/default/files/sc/findaid/2985.pdf
  • “Hon. Lewis E. Texada.” Louisiana Democrat (Alexandria, LA), Aug 26, 1884, p. 2.
  • “Louisiana Legislature.” Baton-Rouge Gazette (Louisiana). February 14, 1846, p.2.
  • Texada tombstone, Texada Cemetery, Rapides Parish, LA. Findagrave.com.
  • [Obituary]. The Town Talk (Alexandria, LA), 31 Aug. 1884, p. 3.
  • University of Virginia Matriculation Books, 1825-1904, Accession #RG-14/4/2.041, Special Collections Dept., University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.
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Joseph Reid Anderson, Jr. (22 Feb. 1851-[ca. 31 Jan.] 1930)

Joseph R. Anderson, Jr., was the son of General Joseph Reid Anderson, Sr., (1813-1892), the owner of Tredegar Iron Works in Richmond, Virginia, and his wife, Sarah Eliza Archer (1819-1881). (Among their several children were Archer Anderson, who also went to U.Va., and Ellen Graham Anderson, who married her cousin William Alexander Anderson.)

Anderson Junior attended Virginia Military Institute in 1870-1871 (VMI Photo), then attended the University of Virginia in session 48 (1871-1872).

Joseph_R_Anderson_Jr_Cadet_Album_18681872

Joseph R. Anderson Jr. as a cadet at VMI.

On 8 Oct. 1873, Anderson Junior married Anne Watson Barbour Morris (1851-1895) (Richmond Whig, 9 Oct. 1873). Their children were Morris (spelled “Maurice” on the birth record), Julian W., Joseph Reid Jr., and Calvert Allan Anderson. (U.S. Census, 1880-1930) There are indications that they had two additional sons, George Watson Anderson and William Anderson, who died young, but these two names do not appear in the U.S. Census.

Anderson, Jr., succeeded his father in running the Tredegar Iron Works. Later in his life he served as the “historiographer” for the Virginia Military Institute, and wrote a book entitled, Record of Service in the World War of V. M. I. Alumni and their alma mater. (University of Virginia, Directory of living alumni, 1921)

Joseph Reid Anderson, Jr. died in early 1930 and was buried in Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, VA on 31 Jan. 1930. (Hollywood Cemetery)

References:

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