Thomas Lawson Barraud (26 May 1828-15 Oct. 1863)

Thomas Lawson Barraud was the son of Dr. Daniel Cary Barraud (1790-1867), of Norfolk, VA, and his wife, Mary Lawson (Chandler) Barraud (1798-1876). Thomas Barraud attended the University of Virginia only for session 26 (1849-1850). While there he studied Law. He then became a lawyer. (Schele de Vere; UVA Matriculation Books) At the time of the 1860 U.S. Census, he lived in a boarding house in Portsmouth, Virginia, so it is likely he practiced there as well. (1860 U.S. Census)

Barraud married Mary Baker (1830?-1910?) on 29 Dec. 1853, in Norfolk, VA. (Widow’s Pension Application; Findagrave.com; Barraud)

In April 1861, when the Confederacy rebelled against the United States, Thomas L. Barraud, then 33 years old, enlisted in Portsmouth’s “Virginia Defenders,” a unit which later became Company C of the 16th Virginia Regiment. Here is a reminiscence written 40 years later, which originated in the Portsmouth Star newspaper:

The company was organized in April 1861, the first year of the war… On May 6, 1862, we left Norfolk for Richmond, for active service with four officers and sixty muskets. Six of the boys were made commissioned officers and served in their commands with credit to themselves and with honor to the old company.

Shortly after we left, several of the men were detailed for other service and several were discharged on account of age. We were thus thinned out until we were left with only four officers an[d] thirty-six men, who were either killed, died in hospital, disabled by wounds, or served with the company until the end.

At this point in the article there is a list of the company’s casualties. Thomas Barraud is at the top of the list. He had been wounded August 30, 1862, at the battle of 2nd Manassas, recovered at the Charlottesville Hospital, returned to his company in January, 1863, and was killed on 15 Oct., 1863, at the battle of Bristoe Station. Though Barraud’s tombstone says he died on October 13, the battle actually occurred on the 14th and he died the next day, so his correct date of death was 15 Oct. 1863. His widow’s pension application states that the battle was fought on the 14th. (Widow’s Pension Application) The American Civil War Museum has a sash that Captain Barraud wore and several swords that he captured at 2nd Manassas. (American Battlefield Trust; American Civil War Museum)

They [Company C] were engaged in the following battles: Charles City Road, Frasier’s Farm, Malvern Hill, Second Manassas, Crampton Gap, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Salem Church, Gettysburg, Mine Run, Bristoe, Rappahannock Station, Wilderness, Cold Harbor, Crater, Burgess Mills, Ream’s Station, Wilcox’s Farm, Davis Farm, Hatcher’s Run, Columbian Church, Five Forks, and then Appomattox.

We lost three officers out of four, eleven men killed and died, fifteen wounded, and we have now seventeen living. Our loss was so great that after Captain Barraud was killed and Lieutenants Baird and King disabled, Captain John H. Gayle was the only officer we had left. He was in every engagement and surrendered the company of five men at Appomattox. These were all we had left. Every man shot was a man gone. No one came to take his place. We had none to recruit from… (Richmond Dispatch, from the Portsmouth Star)

Thomas Barraud was buried in Cedar Grove Cemetery, in Norfolk, VA. (Findagrave.com) Others of his family, his parents and 3 of his siblings, are also buried there. The inscription on his monument reads:

Thomas Lawson Barraud
A Captain in the Army of the
Confederate States
He fell at Bristoe Station, Va.
Oct. 13, 1863
A man filling every relation
of life faithfully, nobly.

References:

  • Barraud Family tombstones, Cedar Grove Cemetery, Norfolk, VA. Findagrave.com.
  • Barraud, E. M. Barraud; the story of a family. London: The Research Publishing Co., 1967, p.47.
  • Barraud, Mary. Pension application filed by Virginia Confederate veterans and their widows. 1902.
  • “Bristoe Station,” American Battlefield Trust. 2020 [Website] https://www.battlefields.org/learn/civil-war/battles/bristoe-station
  • “Co. C, 16th Virginia Regiment; a brief history and list of its gallant members.” Richmond Dispatch, 14 Sep. 1902, p.7.
  • “Sash owned by Captain Thomas Lawson Barraud,” The American Civil War Museum. 2019 [website] https://moconfederacy.pastperfectonline.com/webobject/01FEC87A-195A-4C52-9128-806197385913
  • Schele de Vere, Maximilian. Students of the University of Virginia; a semi-centennial catalogue. Baltimore, MD, 1878.”
  • “United States Census, 1860”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M415-DDN : 13 December 2017), Thos L Barrand in entry for Jos S Brown, 1860.
  • University of Virginia Matriculation Books, 1825-1904, Accession #RG-14/4/2.041, Special Collections Dept., University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.
  • “Virginia Marriages, 1785-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XR2Z-7F2 : 11 February 2018), Thomas Lawson Barraud and Mary Baker, 29 Dec 1853; citing Norfolk, Virginia, reference ; FHL microfilm 2,048,491.
Posted in B | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Thomas Butler King Wylly (13 Oct. 1847-24 Jun. 1900)

King Wylly was one of the sons of George Washington Wylly (1816-1906), a slave trader, and his wife, Sarah Anne Revel (1830-1875). (Findagrave.com) George W. Wylly was also an alderman of Savannah, Georgia, almost continuously from 1858 to 1869, and he was among those who surrendered the city to Gen. Sherman. (Harden; City of Savannah)

It seems likely that Thomas Butler King Wylly was named after Thomas Butler King (1800-1864) who was “a state senator in Georgia in 1832, 1834, 1835, 1837, and 1859; a delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1833 and to the State Whig conventions in 1835 and 1843. … He was elected as a Whig to the Twenty-sixth and Twenty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1839-March 3, 1843), and to the Twenty-ninth, Thirtieth, and Thirty-first Congresses, and served from March 4, 1845, until his resignation in 1850.” He served as the collector of the port of San Francisco from 1850 to 1852 by Presidential appointment. (Biographical Directory)

King grew up in Savannah, GA, then attended the University of Virginia in sessions 43-45 (1866-1869). In 1866, he joined Chi Phi Fraternity. Among the subjects he studied were Latin and Greek, Modern Languages, Chemistry, Medicine, Physiology and Surgery, Anatomy, and Demonstration. As the last five classes indicate, King earned his M.D.  (U.Va. Matriculation Books)

Within a couple of years after he graduated, the Franco-Prussian War broke out, between France and Germany. “Lasting from 19 July 1870 to 28 January 1871, the conflict was caused by Prussian ambitions to extend German unification …” (Wikipedia) Dr. Wylly volunteered as a surgeon in the French Army. He was presented with the Legion of Honor for his distinguished service in the Battle of Paris. (Harden)

About 1895, King Wylly married a woman named Louise M. (I cannot locate her surname) who was born in January 1866. The 1900 U.S. Census, which was taken on 1 Jun. 1900 (just 3 weeks before his death), indicates that the couple had been married for 5 years, and had no children.

Dr. Wylly had a medical practice in New York City, at least in the late 1870s, according to Schele de Vere. He also worked in Florida—one of his later projects was to establish a hospital in Sanford, Florida for the “Plant system.” The Plant system was a conglomeration of various railroads throughout the South, purchased in the late 19th century by Henry Plant. (Florida Star) He died of apoplexy while on a trip to Saratoga Springs, New York, and was buried in the Bonaventure Cemetery, in Savannah, GA. (Daily Times (Troy, NY); Findagrave.com)

References:

  • Chi Phi Fraternity. The Chi Phi Fraternity Centennial Memorial Volume. The Council of Chi Phi Fraternity, 1924, p. 111.
  • City of Savannah, GA. A List of Mayors and Aldermen of the City of Savannah, Georgia, 1790-2012. https://www.savannahga.gov/DocumentCenter/View/1971/List-of-Mayors-and-Aldermen
  • Harden, William. A history of Savannah and South Georgia. Chicago, IL, 1913, v.2, p.564-565.
  • “[Dr. King Wylly obituary].” The Daily Times (Troy, NY). June 25, 1900, p.3.
  • “King, Thomas Butler (1800-1864),”  in Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774-Present. http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=K000215
  • “Latest News and incidents.” [King Wylly obituary] Florida Star (Titusville, FL), 29 Jun. 1900, p. 1
  • Schele de Vere, Maximilian. Students of the University of Virginia; a semi-centennial catalogue. Baltimore, MD, 1878.”
  • United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M3N9-ZPG : accessed 7 January 2020), Louisea M Wylly in household of King Wylly, Militia District 3 Savannah city Ward Jasper, LaFayette, Monterey, Chatham, Georgia, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 67, sheet 31, family 308, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,186.
  • University of Virginia Matriculation Books, 1825-1904, Accession #RG-14/4/2.041, Special Collections Dept., University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.
  • Wylly tombstones, Bonaventure Cemetery, Savannah, GA. Findagrave.com
Posted in W | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Shall Yerger (25 May 1853-22 Jan. 1884)

Shall Yerger was the son of William Yerger (1816–1872), a lawyer and a judge in Jackson, MS, and his wife, Malvina Hogan (Rucks) Yerger (1819–1914). He grew up in Jackson, and attended the University of Virginia in session 47 (1870-1871). There he studied Mathematics, History and Literature, and Modern Languages. In the later years of his life, Shall Yerger was appointed Deputy Sheriff of Bolivar County, Mississippi. He never married.

Yerger had suffered from “chronic gastritis” throughout his life, and that is what caused his death in Bolivar County in 1884. After his death, his remains were buried beside those of his father in Greenwood Cemetery, Jackson, MS.

References:

Posted in Y | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Mark Turner Alexander (14 Jan. 1842-30 Oct. 1927)

Mark T. Alexander was the son of U.S. Congressman Mark Alexander (1792-1883) and his wife, Sally Park (Turner) Alexander (1811-1889), and the brother of Robert Park Alexander. Congressman Alexander was a member of the Virginia House of Delegates from 1815-1819, and from 1845-1846, and served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1819-1833. He declined renomination in 1832. He served as a representative in the Virginia State constitutional convention of 1829-1830. At the end of his life, he and his wife moved to Scotland Neck, North Carolina, to live near their daughter Rebecca (Alexander) Smith. (Biographical Directory)

Mark T. attended the University of Virginia in session 36 (1859-1860). He studied Modern Languages, Mathematics, Chemistry, and Moral Philosophy.

Three sons of the Congressman—James T. Alexander, Robert Park Alexander, and Mark Turner Alexander—served in the Civil War. Mark T. Alexander served throughout the War, “first as a member of Company A, 3rd Virginia Cavalry, then in Wickham’s Brigade, Fitz Lee’s Division, Army of Northern Virginia. On detached service he was at General Fitz Lee’s headquarters, remaining there the last two years of the war.” (Confederate Veteran, 1928)

Later in his life (i.e., after the Civil War), he was “involved in agricultural pursuits,” that is, he was a cotton planter. At various times he lived in Mississippi, Louisville, KY, and for the last eleven years of his life, lived in Lunenburg County, VA.

Mark Turner Alexander never married. He died in Norfolk, VA, and was buried in the Trinity Episcopal Church cemetery in Scotland Neck, NC, with other members of his family. (Virginia Deaths, 1912-2014)

References:

  • Alexander, Mark tombstone, Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery, Scotland Neck, NC. Findagrave.com https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8586874/mark-alexander
  • “Alexander, Mark” in Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774-Present. http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=A000099
  • “Alexander, Mark Turner Death Certificate.” Virginia Department of Health; Richmond, Virginia; Virginia Deaths, 1912-2014. in Ancestry.com. Virginia, Death Records, 1912-2014 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
  • Alexander, Sally Park Turner tombstone, Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery, Scotland Neck, NC. Findagrave.com https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/29859274/sally-park-alexander
  • “Mark T. Alexander [obituary].” Confederate Veteran, v.36, no.1 (Jan. 1928) p.24.
  • Schele de Vere, Maximilian. Students of the University of Virginia; a semi-centennial catalogue. Baltimore, MD, 1878.
  • Trinity Episcopal Church. Trinity Parish Register, Pt. 3. Scotland Neck, North Carolina. Vital records abstracted from the church register. http://www.ncgenweb.us/halifax/vitals/trinity3-reg.htm
  • “United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MC5K-8LG : accessed 8 April 2016), Mark Alexander, Flat Creek, Mecklenburg, Virginia, United States; citing enumeration district ED 147, sheet 204D, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 1378; FHL microfilm 1,255,378.
  • University of Virginia Matriculation Books, 1825-1904, Accession #RG-14/4/2.041, Special Collections Dept., University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.
Posted in A | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Robert Park Alexander (1 Nov. 1838-Feb. 7 1908)

Robert P. Alexander was the son of U.S. Congressman Mark Alexander (1792-1883) and his wife, Sally Park (Turner) Alexander (1811-1889), and brother of Mark Turner Alexander. Congressman Alexander was a member of the Virginia House of Delegates from 1815-1819, and from 1845-1846, and served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1819-1833. He declined renomination in 1832. He served as a representative in the Virginia State constitutional convention of 1829-1830. At the end of his life, he and his wife moved to Scotland Neck, North Carolina, to live near their daughter Rebecca (Alexander) Smith. (Biographical Directory)

Robert first “attended the Randolph Macon Preparatory Department and College, but took no degree.” (Caknipe) He then attended the University of Virginia in session 33 (1856-1857). He studied Chemistry, Medicine, and Anatomy & Surgery among other scientific subjects. At some point, Robert must have attended medical school, but I have not been able to find out where.

Three sons of the Congressman—James T. Alexander, Robert Park Alexander, and Mark Turner Alexander—served in the Civil War. “Robert enlisted in Company F, 14th Virginia Infantry, and was appointed a captain on November 30, 1861. On May 5, 1862, he retired, but on May 5, 1862, he enlisted into Company A, 3rd Virginia Cavalry, and was detailed to the Signal Corps… The Signal Corps was the code name of the spy detachment…” (Caknipe)

As far as is known, Dr. Alexander never married. After the war, he practiced medicine in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, and in the early 1890s moved to Scotland Neck, NC. He died there and was buried there in the Trinity Episcopal Church cemetery, near his mother and father.

References:

  • Alexander, Mark tombstone, Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery, Scotland Neck, NC. Findagrave.com https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8586874/mark-alexander
  • “Alexander, Mark” in Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774-Present. http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=A000099
  • Alexander, Sally Park Turner tombstone, Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery, Scotland Neck, NC. Findagrave.com https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/29859274/sally-park-alexander
  • Caknipe, John, Jr. Randolph Macon College in the Early Years: Making Preachers, Teachers and Confederate Officers, 1830-1868. Jefferson, NC, McFarland, 2015, p. 98-99.
  • “Dr. Robert P. Alexander [obituary].” Richmond Times Dispatch, 13 February 1908, p.2.
  • “Capt. R. P. Alexander [obituary].” Confederate Veteran, v.16 (1908), p.359.
  • “United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MC5K-8LG : accessed 8 April 2016), Mark Alexander, Flat Creek, Mecklenburg, Virginia, United States; citing enumeration district ED 147, sheet 204D, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 1378; FHL microfilm 1,255,378.
  • University of Virginia Matriculation Books, 1825-1904, Accession #RG-14/4/2.041, Special Collections Dept., University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.
Posted in A | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment