Henry Waldrum Addison (Sep. 1834-10 Jan. 1909)

Henry Waldrum Addison was born in September 1834 in Edgefield District, South Carolina. His parents were Joseph R. Addison (1798-1835), and his second wife, Matilda Waldrum (1805-1870). In the U.Va. Matriculation Books, his parent or guardian is a W. B. Addison. Since his father died soon after his birth, W. B. Addison was his guardian.

Henry attended the University of Virginia in session 30 (1853-1854), where he studied Ancient Languages and Moral Philosophy. After he left U.Va., he established a law practice with W. C. Moragne in December 1855 in Edgefield District. He was living in Edgefield Village in 1860.

Henry enlisted in the Confederate Army in Aiken, SC, on 15 Apr. 1861. He was elected Captain of Company H, 7th South Carolina Infantry on 13 May 1862. He was wounded in the thigh by canister shot at Antietam on 17 Sept. 1862. After serving as judge advocate for his division from for the first six months of 1863, he returned to the infantry and was wounded in the left leg at Chickamauga on 20 Sep. 1863. As a result his leg was amputated. On 16 Aug 1864, after being hospitalized for “debility” and then pneumonia, he was deemed a fit subject for retirement. He returned to his law practice and was a prominent member of the Edgefield Bar. (Buchanan; H. W. Waldrum service file; Wycoff)

Henry was married to Leila E. Wallace (1844-1906). The couple had two children, named Wallace Gordon Addison and Laura Addison.

The 1900 census records that Henry and Leila Addison were then living in the household of their daughter and son-in-law, John Carey Lamar, in Aiken County, SC. They lived there from 1895 until the times of their deaths. Henry, Leila, and their son Wallace are buried at Magnolia Cemetery, Augusta, Ga. Their daughter and son-in-law are also buried in that cemetery.

[Note: H. W. Addison’s birth month and year is from the U.Va. Matriculation Books. His death date is from newspaper announcements.–JLC]

References:

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John A. Adams (1 Aug. 1817-19 Jan. 1882)

John A. Adams was the son of John Adams (1776-1837) and his wife, Mary “Polly” Smith (b. ca. 1775-1839), both of whom are buried in Muskingum Presbyterian Cemetery, Nashport, Ohio. John A. Adams, the son, attended the University of Virginia in session 13 (1836-1837), where he studied Chemistry, Medicine, and Anatomy and Surgery. His guardian while at U.Va. was Turners Adams, of Oak Hill, Fauquier County, VA, possibly his uncle. After his year at U.Va., he is said to have attended the University of Pennsylvania, although I can find no evidence of his attendance in the Catalogue of the Alumni of the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania, 1765-1877.

Dr. Adams established his practice at Turners, in Fauquier County. (Originally called Piedmont Station, its name was changed in 1874 to Delaplane.) In the 1850 U.S. Census, his profession is given as Physician. He married Mary E. Barbee (1826-1881) on 10 Feb. 1840 in Fauquier County. They had several children, among them: Mary L., Virginia J., Anna C., Rebecca Agnes, Ida D., Lillie, and Claudia. By the Census of 1880, the Adamses are living in Amissville, in Rappahannock County, Virginia, where Mrs. Adams is described as “paralyzed.”

On 24 April 1861, Dr. Adams enlisted in H Company of the 6th Cavalry (Virginia) as a captain. In a hearing regarding “Capt. Adams’ qualifications and his fitness for promotion,” held on Aug. 18, 1862, Robert Galt, Surgeon of the 6th Cavalry testified that Adams suffered from dropsy, resulting from heart disease. At this hearing, Col. Thomas S. Flournoy testified that “Capt. Adams is physically incapable of discharging his duties as an officer.” Capt. Adams resigned his position on Sep 19 1862. (“Dr. John A. Adams.” Compiled service record)

Dr. Adams and his wife Mary are buried in Cool Spring Methodist Church Cemetery, Delaplane, Fauquier Co., VA.

[Note: John A. Adams’ birth date is taken from the U.Va. Matriculation Books; the birth date on his tombstone is 1 Aug. 1819. His death date is from his tombstone.—JLC]

References:

  • Adams tombstones, Cool Spring Methodist Church Cemetery, Delaplane, Fauquier Co., VA, and Muskingum Presbyterian Cemetery, Nashport, OH. Findagrave.com.
  • Alumni of the Medical Department, University of Pennsylvania. Catalogue of the Alumni of the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania, 1765-1877. Philadelphia, PA, 1877.
  • Ancestry.com. 1850-1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.
  • Ancestry.com. Virginia, Marriages, 1740-1850 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.
  • “Delaplane Historic District, Fauquier County, Virginia, VDHR #030-0002.” 12/23/2003. http://www.dhr.virginia.gov/registers/Counties/Fauquier/030-0002_Delaplane_HD_2004_Final_Nomination.pdf
  • “Dr. John A. Adams.” Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Virginia. M324. Carded Records Showing Military Service of Soldiers Who Fought in Confederate Organizations , compiled 1903-1927, documenting the period 1861-1865, Record group 109.
  • Jones, Sue Annabrooke. “Gibbons Family Tree.” [database online] http://www.genspirit.com/gibbons.htm
  • National Park Service. U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.
  • Schele de Vere, Maximilian. Students of the University of Virginia; a semi-centennial catalogue. Baltimore, MD, 1878.
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James Anderson Agnew (23 Mar. 1828-1 Oct. 1879) 

James A. Agnew (listed in the U.Va. Catalogue as “James M. A. Agnew”), was the son of Dr. James A. Agnew (1793-1849) of Prince Edward County, Virginia, and his wife, Martha Ann Miller (1803-1868). The Agnew family lived at “Roseland” in Burkeville, Prince Edward County.

The younger James A. Agnew attended the University of Virginia in session 23 (1846-1847). He studied Chemistry, Medicine, Anatomy and Surgery. The next year he attended the Medical College of the University of New York, from which he earned his M.D. in 1848. (Alumni Association of the University of New York) He established his practice in Nottoway, VA.

Dr. Agnew married Martha “Pattie” Chaffin Scott (1832-1872) in Nottoway, VA, on 15 Nov. 1854. The couple had eleven children, including Culilo (d. young), James Perkinson, Mattie B., T. Scott, Eliza W., Mary C., William B., Ella Graham, Anne “Jean” Virginia Agnew. (1860 & 1870 U.S. Census) The family lived at “Roseland” until it burned in 1871. Pattie Agnew died soon after the birth of her last child, Anne Virginia, and Dr. Agnew married secondly, in 1877, Elizabeth Jane McLean (1836-1918). She and Dr. Agnew had no children together, but she raised the youngest children after Dr. Agnew died two years later. (Virginia Cooperative Extension)

Dr. Agnew, both his wives, his parents, and several of his children, are buried at Sunset Hill Cemetery, in Burkeville, Virginia.

 [Note: Dr. James Anderson Agnew’s birth date is from the U.Va. Matriculation Books; his middle name is from his tombstone; and his death date is from “Virginia, Deaths and Burials, 1853-1912.”—JLC]

References:

  • Agnew tombstones, Sunset Hill Cemetery, Burkeville, VA, in Findagrave.com.
  • Alumni Association.  Catalogue of the Graduates and Officers of the Medical Department of the University of the City of New York. October, 1890. 3rd ed. New York, 1890, p. 75.
  • “Ella Graham Agnew (1871-1958).” in Virginia Cooperative Extension, “Early Days of Virginia’s Extension Service [website] c2014. http://vtpp.ext.vt.edu/museum-of-pest-management/early-days-of-virginias-extension-service/ella-graham-agnew-1871-1958
  • Schele de Vere, Maximilian. Students of the University of Virginia; a semi-centennial catalogue. Baltimore, MD, 1878.
  • “United States Census, 1850,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M8DN-8RF : accessed 28 February 2015), James A Agnew in household of Mary A Ellington, Nottoway county, Nottoway, Virginia, United States; citing family 216, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • “United States Census, 1860,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M41K-THN : accessed 28 February 2015), J A Agnew, 1 Magisterial District, Nottoway, Virginia, United States; from “1860 U.S. Federal Census – Population,” Fold3.com; citing p. 48, household ID 342, NARA microfilm publication M653, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C.; FHL microfilm 805,367.
  • “United States Census, 1870,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MFGQ-G95 : accessed 28 February 2015), Jos A Agnew, Virginia, United States; citing p. 103, family 758, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 553,172.
  • “United States Census, 1880,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MC5R-F5H : accessed 28 February 2015), J Perkinson Agnew, Haytokah, Nottoway, Virginia, United States; citing enumeration district 155, sheet 177A, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 1382; FHL microfilm 1,255,382.
  • “United States Census, 1900,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MMNX-714 : accessed 28 February 2015), Ella T Agnew in household of Eliza Agnew, Haytokah District (south part, excl. Burkeville town), Nottoway, Virginia, United States; citing sheet 7A, family 91, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,241,721.
  • “United States Census, 1910,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MPGQ-TBZ : accessed 28 February 2015), Elizabeth Agnew in household of Macleon B Leath, Haytokah, Nottoway, Virginia, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 71, sheet 18A, family 76, NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,375,652.
  • University of Virginia Matriculation Books, 1825-1904, Accession #RG-14/4/2.041, Special Collections Dept., University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.
  • “Virginia, Deaths and Burials, 1853-1912,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XR3Y-RH2 : accessed 28 February 2015), James A. Agnew, 01 Oct 1879; citing Nottoway, Virginia, reference e 1; FHL microfilm 2,048,580.
  • “Virginia, Marriages, 1785-1940,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XRND-G76 : accessed 28 February 2015), James A. Agnew and Pattie C. Scott, 15 Nov 1854; citing Amelia, Virginia, reference Pg 1; FHL microfilm 30,474.
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Richard Wilson Aiken (2 Aug. 1807-[30 Dec.?] 1865)

Born in Chesterfield County, Virginia, Richard Aiken was the son of Pleasant Aiken (1769-1847), a War of 1812 veteran, and the owner of Varina Plantation, which he purchased from Thomas Mann Randolph. [N.b. The name is also spelled Aikin and Akin in the sources. — JLC]

He attended the University of Virginia in session 2 (1 Feb.-15 Dec. 1826) although a note in the Matriculation Books states that he “left here in July.” Richard Aikin became a farmer in Prince George County, VA. On 15 May 1834, he married Johanna Winifred Chappell (b. 1814). According to the 1850 and 1860 U.S. Censuses, the couple had several children: Hester A., Richard P., John, George E., Laura J., Martha E., Octavia E., William W., and Emma W. Aikin.

Richard P. Aiken died 27 Jul. 1862 of disease while in Company B of the 12th Regiment of Virginia Infantry, CSA. George E. Aiken also served the Confederacy in Company I of the 12th Regiment of Virginia Infantry. Richard Wilson Aiken died soon after the Civil War. By the time of the 1870 Census, only George, William, and Octavia were living at home in Prince George County, VA, with their mother.

When the W.P.A. Historical Survey was done in 1937, the Aiken House in Petersburg, VA, was located on the grounds of the Central State Hospital. In the descriptive materials about the house, it says, “The Aiken House was on the battle ground of the battles of June 22, 1864 and August 18, 1864, when General Grant attempted to capture the Weldon Railroad, and it was called the oasis in the desert because the members of the Aiken Family, particularly the daughters, had been kind to both the Northern and Confederate soldiers. The family was supplied with food by the Federal Army.” The house was sold to Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Lawrence by Johanna W. Aiken in 1877. (WPA, 1937)

[Note: Birth date from U.Va. Matriculation Books; death date from Hallet/Aikin Family tree and Schele de Vere.—JLC]

References:

  • carter hallett. Hallett/Aiken Family Tree. [database online] http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/25758411/person/1712351433?ssrc=
  • Pleasant Aikin grave, Blandford Cemetery, Petersburg, VA. Findagrave.com.
  • “Pleasant Aiken,” Muster rolls, p. 190, in Pay Rolls of Militia Entitled to Land Bounty Under the Act of Congress of Sept. 28, 1850 (Richmond, 1851) and: Muster Rolls of the Virginia Militia in the War of 1812 (Richmond, 1852). Library of Virginia.
  • Schele de Vere, Maximilian. Students of the University of Virginia; a semi-centennial catalogue. Baltimore, MD, 1878.
  • “United States Census, 1850,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M8DK-P5L : accessed 10 May 2014), Richd W Aiken, Prince George county, Prince George, Virginia, United States; citing family 369, NARA microfilm publication M432.
  • “United States Census, 1860,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M41T-5X8 : accessed 10 May 2014), R W Aiken, [Blank], Prince George, Virginia, United States; citing “1860 U.S. Federal Census – Population,” Fold3.com; p. 61, household ID 506, NARA microfilm publication M653; FHL microfilm 805372.
  • “United States Census, 1870,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MFGQ-RN4 : accessed 28 February 2015), J W Akins in household of Geo E Akins, Virginia, United States; citing p. 80, family 233, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 553,172.
  • United States. Carded Records Showing Military Service of Soldiers Who Fought in Confederate Organizations, compiled 1903-1927, documenting the period 1861-1865, Virginia. Record group 109. Microfilm roll 0514.
  • University of Virginia Matriculation Books, 1825-1904, Accession #RG-14/4/2.041, Special Collections Dept., University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.
  • “Virginia, Deaths and Burials, 1853-1912,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X519-L3G : accessed 19 Apr 2014), J W Aiken in entry for Martha Lawrence, 08 Dec 1891; citing Petersburg, Virginia, reference p 12 ln 417; FHL microfilm 2048594.
  • “Virginia, Deaths and Burials, 1853-1912,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X5R6-MBV : accessed 28 February 2015), Richard Aiken in entry for Geo E. Aiken, 01 Jan 1883; citing Petersburg, Va, reference p 1; FHL microfilm 33,443.
  • “Virginia, Marriages, 1785-1940,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XRM7-5NG : accessed 19 Apr 2014), R. W. Aikin in entry for V. W. Lanier and Emma W. Aikin, 24 Feb 1870; citing Pr. Geo., Virginia, reference Pr. Geo. Image 455; FHL microfilm 2048470.
  • WPA. Aiken House. Virginia Historical Inventory survey report: VHIR/22/0374. (Located at the Library of Virginia.) Report: http://image.lva.virginia.gov/VHI/html/22/0374.html Report Home Page. Photograph: http://image.lva.virginia.gov/VHI/P/22/0031.jpg Photograph
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Jonathan Lawrence Adams (28 Sep.1851-13 Mar. 1889)

Jonathan L. Adams’s father was Abram B. Adams (b. 1818), a “warehouse and commission agent” (i.e., a cotton merchant); his mother was Henrietta Hollingsworth (1830-13 Sep. 1889). The family lived in Macon, Georgia. (1860-1880 U.S. Censuses) Abram Adams states in his request for amnesty after the Civil War that he did not support the Confederacy but took the job as government wool agent in Macon because he either had to do that or go into the army. (“Amnesty Papers.”)

Jonathan attended the University of Virginia in session 46 (1869-1870), where he studied Latin, Greek, and Mathematics. He went into the same business as his father, and by 1878, he was part of the firm A. B. Adams & Son. (Macon Telegraph and Messenger, 11 Aug. 1878) In the 1880 U.S. Census, Jonathan was single and living with his parents. From about 1885, Jonathan took primary charge of the Adams & Son cotton factoring business.

“On Friday, Feb. 15 [1889], about 11 o’clock at night Jonathan L. Adams was placed in the jail of Bibb county [Georgia] charged with the crime of forgery.—First a single charge, then another, then they came thick and fast.” His crime seems to have been forging notes (i.e., checks) drawn on the cotton accounts of Adams & Son’s customers. “But sensitive as was his nature, he had the fortitude to say that the fault was all his own and that no one save himself was responsible for any of the troubles that had befallen him and his people.” Undertaking a fast, he refused food for twenty-six days before he died of starvation. He left behind his parents, his siblings, and a life insurance policy for $18,000, which was fought over by his creditors. (Union Recorder (Milledgeville, GA), 19 Mar. 1889; Pittsburg dispatch (Pittsburg, PA), 15 Mar. 1889)

Abram, Henrietta, and Jonathan L. Adams are buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, Macon, GA.

[Note: J. L. Adams’s birth date is from the U.Va. Matriculation books.—JLC]

References:

  • Adams tombstones, Rose Hill Cemetery, Macon, GA. Findagrave.com.
  • Ancestry.com. 1860-1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.
  • “Abram B. Adams.” United States. Case Files of Applications from Former Confederates for Presidential Pardons (“Amnesty Papers”), 1865-67, record group 94. Publication M1003, roll 0016. Fold3.com. http://www.fold3.com/image/19856728/
  • “Georgia, County Marriages, 1785-1950,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.2/9MVT-GXGX : accessed 14 Jun 2014), Abraham B. Adams and Henrietta Hollingsworth, 05 Nov 1850; citing Bibb, Georgia, United States; FHL microfilm 394102.
  • “The Long Fast Broken.” Union Recorder (Milledgeville, GA), 19 Mar. 1889, p. 1.
  • “Starved himself to death.” Murfreesboro Index (Murfreesboro, NC), 22 Mar. 1889, p. 4.
  • “Suicide by starvation.” Pittsburg dispatch (Pittsburg, PA), 15 Mar. 1889, p. 1
  • “To the planters and merchants of middle and southwest Georgia. [Advertisement]” Macon Telegraph and Messenger (Macon, GA), 11 Aug. 1878, p.1.
  • University of Virginia Matriculation Books, 1825-1904, Accession #RG-14/4/2.041, Special Collections Dept., University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.
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