Frederick Wistar Leonard Andrews (27 Apr. 1834-1875)

F. W. Andrews was born in Edgefield District, SC, and was the son of Dr. Ephraim A. Andrews Jr. (1801-1878) and his wife, Elizabeth Frances Bullock (1816-1877). Frederick attended the University of Virginia in session 32 (1855-1856).

During the Civil War, Andrews first served as a 2nd lieutenant in Company G of the First South Carolina Regiment (Gregg’s). He resigned that position in Dec. 1861, and enlisted as a 2nd lieutenant in Company K of the 24th South Carolina Volunteer Infantry. He fought in the Battle of Secessionville (the First Battle of James Island) on 16 Jun. 1862, and was wounded. He was severely wounded again at the Battle of Nashville (15-16 Dec. 1864), and captured at Franklin, TN on 18 Dec. 1864; he was  imprisoned in Nashville. In Jan. 1865, he was moved to Kentucky, and in March 1865, he was moved to Camp Chase, OH. Two weeks later he was moved to Point Lookout, MD, and exchanged to Stuart Hospital in Richmond, VA ten days later. (Kirkland; Chase)

On 18 Nov. 1856, Andrews married Frances Joyce DeVore (1837-1918); the couple had the following children: Ephraim Ernest, Sumter Beauregard, James Leslie, Elbert DeVore, Caroline,  George Sheppard, Elizabeth. (1880 US. Census) The family moved to Greenwood County, SC. Frederick W. and Frances Andrews were buried at the First Damascus Baptist Church Cemetery in Phoenix, SC.

References:

  • Ancestry.com. 1850-1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc.
  • Andrews graves, Damascus Baptist Church Cemetery, Phoenix, SC & Andrews/Bullock Coffeetown Creek Plantation Cemetery, Kirksey, SC. Findagrave.com (Accessed 5/31/12).
  • Chapman, John A. History of Edgefield County from the earliest settlements to 1897. Newberry, SC., 1897. p. 492.
  • De Vries, Darlene. Edwards/De Vries and related families. [website] http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=ddevries&id=I00529 (Accessed 9/30/2011).
  • Kirkland, Randolph Withers. Dark Hours;  South Carolina soldiers, sailors,and citizens held in U.S. prisons, 1861-1865. Charleston, SC, 2002, p.9.
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