Richard Justin McCarty (12 Mar. 1851-16 Jun. 1934)

This branch of the McCarty family was descended from Patrick McCarty of Hampshire County, Virginia, through his son Col. Edward McCarty.  Col. Edward’s son Edward was Richard Justin McCarty’s grandfather. His father, Edward McCarty the younger’s son, was Col. Joseph Cresap McCarty, a merchant. R.J.’s mother was Ann McCally, Col. Joseph McCarty’s first wife. R. J. was born in Clarksburg, WV; the family moved from West Virginia, to Kansas City, Missouri, to Sabine Pass, Texas, to Chappell Hill, Texas. In his autobiography, R. J. McCarty states that his father was related to the McCartys of Loudoun County, Virginia, but gives no further details. (McCarty, R. J.)

R. J. McCarty attended Soule University, in Chapell Hill, Texas, on and off between 1862 and 1869, and taught briefly at Soule University in the 1870s. He attended the University of Virginia in sessions 46-47 (1869-1871) and earned a certificate in Pure Mathematics. He was a member of Beta Chapter of Zeta Psi Fraternity. After working on the railroad for three years, he went back to U.Va. for session 51 (1874-1875), during which time he earned a degree in Applied Mathematics and Civil Engineering. Back in Kansas City, McCarty worked his way up in the railroad industry, working for the Kansas Rolling Mill Company, the Metropolitan Street Railway Company of Kansas City, MO, and the Kansas City Southern Railroad, from which he retired as a vice president in 1918.

On 24 Jun. 1877, McCarty married Mary Louise Allen (1854-1947), and the couple had three children, Allen McCarty (b. 31 Aug 1880), Richard Justin McCarty, Jr. (b. 8 Aug 1883), and Charles Edward McCarty (b. 17 June 1886). They lived in Kansas City for the rest of their lives, well-known and respected in their community. Richard J. McCarty, Sr., died of heart disease and chronic bronchitis in 1934, and is buried at Union Cemetery, Kansas City, MO, with his wife and his son Richard Jr.

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