Henry Waldrum Addison (Sep. 1834-10 Jan. 1909)

Henry Waldrum Addison was born in September 1834 in Edgefield District, South Carolina. His parents were Joseph R. Addison (1798-1835), and his second wife, Matilda Waldrum (1805-1870). In the U.Va. Matriculation Books, his parent or guardian is a W. B. Addison. Since his father died soon after his birth, W. B. Addison was his guardian.

Henry attended the University of Virginia in session 30 (1853-1854), where he studied Ancient Languages and Moral Philosophy. After he left U.Va., he established a law practice with W. C. Moragne in December 1855 in Edgefield District. He was living in Edgefield Village in 1860.

Henry enlisted in the Confederate Army in Aiken, SC, on 15 Apr. 1861. He was elected Captain of Company H, 7th South Carolina Infantry on 13 May 1862. He was wounded in the thigh by canister shot at Antietam on 17 Sept. 1862. After serving as judge advocate for his division from for the first six months of 1863, he returned to the infantry and was wounded in the left leg at Chickamauga on 20 Sep. 1863. As a result his leg was amputated. On 16 Aug 1864, after being hospitalized for “debility” and then pneumonia, he was deemed a fit subject for retirement. He returned to his law practice and was a prominent member of the Edgefield Bar. (Buchanan; H. W. Waldrum service file; Wycoff)

Henry was married to Leila E. Wallace (1844-1906). The couple had two children, named Wallace Gordon Addison and Laura Addison.

The 1900 census records that Henry and Leila Addison were then living in the household of their daughter and son-in-law, John Carey Lamar, in Aiken County, SC. They lived there from 1895 until the times of their deaths. Henry, Leila, and their son Wallace are buried at Magnolia Cemetery, Augusta, Ga. Their daughter and son-in-law are also buried in that cemetery.

[Note: H. W. Addison’s birth month and year is from the U.Va. Matriculation Books. His death date is from newspaper announcements.–JLC]

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