Mark Turner Alexander (14 Jan. 1842-30 Oct. 1927)

Mark T. Alexander was the son of U.S. Congressman Mark Alexander (1792-1883) and his wife, Sally Park (Turner) Alexander (1811-1889), and the brother of Robert Park Alexander. Congressman Alexander was a member of the Virginia House of Delegates from 1815-1819, and from 1845-1846, and served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1819-1833. He declined renomination in 1832. He served as a representative in the Virginia State constitutional convention of 1829-1830. At the end of his life, he and his wife moved to Scotland Neck, North Carolina, to live near their daughter Rebecca (Alexander) Smith. (Biographical Directory)

Mark T. attended the University of Virginia in session 36 (1859-1860). He studied Modern Languages, Mathematics, Chemistry, and Moral Philosophy.

Three sons of the Congressman—James T. Alexander, Robert Park Alexander, and Mark Turner Alexander—served in the Civil War. Mark T. Alexander served throughout the War, “first as a member of Company A, 3rd Virginia Cavalry, then in Wickham’s Brigade, Fitz Lee’s Division, Army of Northern Virginia. On detached service he was at General Fitz Lee’s headquarters, remaining there the last two years of the war.” (Confederate Veteran, 1928)

Later in his life (i.e., after the Civil War), he was “involved in agricultural pursuits,” that is, he was a cotton planter. At various times he lived in Mississippi, Louisville, KY, and for the last eleven years of his life, lived in Lunenburg County, VA.

Mark Turner Alexander never married. He died in Norfolk, VA, and was buried in the Trinity Episcopal Church cemetery in Scotland Neck, NC, with other members of his family. (Virginia Deaths, 1912-2014)

References:

  • Alexander, Mark tombstone, Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery, Scotland Neck, NC. Findagrave.com https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8586874/mark-alexander
  • “Alexander, Mark” in Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774-Present. http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=A000099
  • “Alexander, Mark Turner Death Certificate.” Virginia Department of Health; Richmond, Virginia; Virginia Deaths, 1912-2014. in Ancestry.com. Virginia, Death Records, 1912-2014 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
  • Alexander, Sally Park Turner tombstone, Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery, Scotland Neck, NC. Findagrave.com https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/29859274/sally-park-alexander
  • “Mark T. Alexander [obituary].” Confederate Veteran, v.36, no.1 (Jan. 1928) p.24.
  • Schele de Vere, Maximilian. Students of the University of Virginia; a semi-centennial catalogue. Baltimore, MD, 1878.
  • Trinity Episcopal Church. Trinity Parish Register, Pt. 3. Scotland Neck, North Carolina. Vital records abstracted from the church register. http://www.ncgenweb.us/halifax/vitals/trinity3-reg.htm
  • “United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MC5K-8LG : accessed 8 April 2016), Mark Alexander, Flat Creek, Mecklenburg, Virginia, United States; citing enumeration district ED 147, sheet 204D, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 1378; FHL microfilm 1,255,378.
  • University of Virginia Matriculation Books, 1825-1904, Accession #RG-14/4/2.041, Special Collections Dept., University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.
Posted in A | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Robert Park Alexander (1 Nov. 1838-Feb. 7 1908)

Robert P. Alexander was the son of U.S. Congressman Mark Alexander (1792-1883) and his wife, Sally Park (Turner) Alexander (1811-1889), and brother of Mark Turner Alexander. Congressman Alexander was a member of the Virginia House of Delegates from 1815-1819, and from 1845-1846, and served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1819-1833. He declined renomination in 1832. He served as a representative in the Virginia State constitutional convention of 1829-1830. At the end of his life, he and his wife moved to Scotland Neck, North Carolina, to live near their daughter Rebecca (Alexander) Smith. (Biographical Directory)

Robert first “attended the Randolph Macon Preparatory Department and College, but took no degree.” (Caknipe) He then attended the University of Virginia in session 33 (1856-1857). He studied Chemistry, Medicine, and Anatomy & Surgery among other scientific subjects. At some point, Robert must have attended medical school, but I have not been able to find out where.

Three sons of the Congressman—James T. Alexander, Robert Park Alexander, and Mark Turner Alexander—served in the Civil War. “Robert enlisted in Company F, 14th Virginia Infantry, and was appointed a captain on November 30, 1861. On May 5, 1862, he retired, but on May 5, 1862, he enlisted into Company A, 3rd Virginia Cavalry, and was detailed to the Signal Corps… The Signal Corps was the code name of the spy detachment…” (Caknipe)

As far as is known, Dr. Alexander never married. After the war, he practiced medicine in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, and in the early 1890s moved to Scotland Neck, NC. He died there and was buried there in the Trinity Episcopal Church cemetery, near his mother and father.

References:

  • Alexander, Mark tombstone, Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery, Scotland Neck, NC. Findagrave.com https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8586874/mark-alexander
  • “Alexander, Mark” in Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774-Present. http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=A000099
  • Alexander, Sally Park Turner tombstone, Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery, Scotland Neck, NC. Findagrave.com https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/29859274/sally-park-alexander
  • Caknipe, John, Jr. Randolph Macon College in the Early Years: Making Preachers, Teachers and Confederate Officers, 1830-1868. Jefferson, NC, McFarland, 2015, p. 98-99.
  • “Dr. Robert P. Alexander [obituary].” Richmond Times Dispatch, 13 February 1908, p.2.
  • “Capt. R. P. Alexander [obituary].” Confederate Veteran, v.16 (1908), p.359.
  • “United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MC5K-8LG : accessed 8 April 2016), Mark Alexander, Flat Creek, Mecklenburg, Virginia, United States; citing enumeration district ED 147, sheet 204D, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 1378; FHL microfilm 1,255,378.
  • University of Virginia Matriculation Books, 1825-1904, Accession #RG-14/4/2.041, Special Collections Dept., University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.
Posted in A | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

The Killing of Professor Davis

A list of recent articles about the killing of Professor John A. G. Davis at U.Va. in 1841.

“A masked shooter. A campus killing. And a manhunt 159 years before Columbine,” by Michael S. Rosenwald. Washington Post, April 20, 2018.

Librarian Solves Mystery of First School Shooting in the U.S. (A radio interview with Sandy Hausman, of Radio IQ – WVTF radio (an NPR station) on May 3, 2018.)

“As America Grapples With Gun Violence in Schools, a UVA Librarian Recounts How — and Where — It All Began,” by Taylor Swaak, T74, June 4, 2018.

 

Posted in Podcast | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

William Allan (12 Nov. 1837-17 Sep. 1889)

William Allan was born in Winchester, VA. He was the son of Thomas Allan (1802-1873) of Winchester, and his wife, Jane Dowdell (or Dowdall) George Allan (1803-1862). (Gunter; Findagrave.com) After attending a local school for his early education, William Allan enrolled in the University of Virginia and attended sessions 34-36 (1857-1860). There he studied a broad curriculum, including Greek and Latin, Modern Languages, Mathematics, Chemistry, Natural Philosophy, History and Literature, Medicine, and Anatomy and Surgery.

After graduating, William Allan taught school in Albemarle County, VA, until he enlisted in the Confederate Army at the beginning of the Civil War. (Krick) He served for the entire length of the War, under Generals Stonewall Jackson, Richard S. Ewell, and Jubal Early, and participated in many battles, including Harpers Ferry, Antietam, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. Allan rose to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel and to the position of Ordnance Officer of the Army of Northern Virginia. (Gunter; War of the Rebellion)

After the War, Col. Allan worked as a bank cashier for a time. In 1866, Robert E. Lee recruited Col. Allan to join the faculty of Washington College (now Washington and Lee University) in the chair of applied mathematics. Allan left Washington College in 1873 to become the first principal of the McDonogh School, a school for poor boys, located in Owings Mills, MD.

About 1877, Col. Allan married Elizabeth Randolph Preston (1848-1933), and they had several children: Margaret R., Jannet G., John Preston, William, Joe B. (a daughter), Lucy Alexander (died young), and Thomas (died young) Allan. (1880 & 1900 U.S. Censuses)

Col. Allan was a prolific writer, and published books and articles on applied mathematics, including Notes on Rankine’s Textbook of Engineering, The Theory of Arches (1874), and The Strength of Materials, as well as books and articles on Confederate history, including History of the Campaign of Gen. T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia from November 4, 1861 to June 17, 1862 (1880), and The Army of Northern Virginia in 1862 (1892).

He died in 1889 of Bright’s Disease [chronic nephritis], after an illness of about 6 months. He was buried in the cemetery of the McDonogh Institute, with his two youngest children, who had predeceased him. His wife, Elizabeth, survived him by 44 years. She lived with her son Dr. William Allan in Charlotte, North Carolina. When she died, she was buried in Elmwood Cemetery, in Charlotte. (Gunter)

References:

  • Allan, Elizabeth tombstone, in Elmwood Cemetery, Charlotte, NC. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/33252008/elizabeth-randolph-allan
  • Allan, Jane D. tombstone, in Mount Hebron Cemetery, Winchester, VA https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/71758091/jane-d-allan
  • Allan, Thomas tombstone, in Mount Hebron Cemetery, Winchester, VA https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/196616011/thomas-allan
  • Allan, William. History of the Campaign of Gen. T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia from November 4, 1861 to June 17, 1862. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1880. https://archive.org/details/historyofcampaig00alla/
  • Allan, William & John Johnson. Life and work of John McDonogh & Sketch of the McDonogh School. Press of I. Friedenwald. Baltimore, Maryland, 1886.
  • Allan, William. Army of Northern Virginia in 1862. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1892.
  • “Allan, William (1837-1889).” in Alphabetical list of collectors included in the Putnam Museum herbarium biography compilation. http://www.plantsofiowa.com/BDI_collector_list.html
  • Allan, William tombstone, in McDonogh Institute Cemetery, Owings Mills, MD. Findagrave.com. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/76899241/william-allan
  • Gunter, D. W., & the Dictionary of Virginia Biography. William Allan (1837–1889). (2017, February 23). In Encyclopedia Virginia. Retrieved from http://www.EncyclopediaVirginia.org/Allan_William_1837-1889.
  • Krick, Robert E. L. Staff Officers in Gray; a biographical register of the staff officers in the Army of Northern Virginia. Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press, 2003.
  • Macdonald, R.W. (ed.). “Death of Col. William Allan.” The Week. 7(12) (21 Sep 1889):45-48. https://www.mcdonogh.org/theweek/issues/archive/1880/18890921.pdf
  • “United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MN3B-DTX : 8 September 2017), William Allan, District 2, Baltimore, Maryland, United States; citing enumeration district ED 225, sheet 460A, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,254,495.
  • “United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MMJS-MQ5 : accessed 3 January 2020), Jennett G Allen in household of Elizabeth Allen, Lexington Township Lexington town, Rockbridge, Virginia, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 97, sheet 1B, family 10, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,241,725.
  • United States. War Department, Report of Lieut. Col. William Allan, C. S. Army, Chief of Ordnance, of ordnance and ordnance stores collected on the Wilderness battle-field May 5-7, [1864]. Dated December 28, 1864, in The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1891, Ser. I, Vol. 36, Part 1, reports, document no. 286, p.1076.
  • William Allan Papers, #2764, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. https://finding-aids.lib.unc.edu/02764/#d1e49
Posted in A | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

William Jones Allen (20 Sep. 1838-5 Jul. 1890)

William J. Allen was the son of Robert Henderson Allen and his wife, Ann Elizabeth (Bagley) Allen, of Lunenburg County, Virginia. Robert H. Allen was a grandson of Jones Allen, a farmer in Lunenburg County, and “likewise followed agricultural pursuits.” Robert and Ann had 10 children. (Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, v.4, p. 420)

William Allen attended “Old Oaks,” a private boys’ school, and then attended the University of Virginia in session 35 (1858-1859), studying Chemistry, Medicine, Surgery and Physiology, Anatomy, and Botany. He began his medical education in Philadelphia, but soon after John Brown’s raid upon Harper’s Ferry, Allen was one of the hundred students who withdrew from the Philadelphia medical school, and completed his degree in the Medical College of Virginia in 1860. Dr. Allen began his practice in Lunenburg, Virginia.

In 1861, Dr. Allen enlisted as a private in Company C, 20th Virginia Infantry, which was recruited at Lunenburg. In 1862, he transferred to Company F, Virginia Heavy Artillery, and was stationed at the Post Hospital in Chaffin’s Bluff, Virginia. Before the end of the Civil War, he served as a surgeon in the Richmond Hospital. For 3 months immediately after the surrender, Dr. Allen was incarcerated as a prisoner of war at Point Lookout, VA.

When the War ended, Dr. Allen resumed his practice in Lunenburg, Virginia, and in 1890, moved to Petersburg, Virginia. In 1868, He married Martha Louisa Bragg (ca.1844-1922). Their children were: Emily Taylor, Anna, and William Cornelius Allen. Dr. Allen was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and was a Mason. He died in 1890 in Petersburg, Virginia, and is buried in Blandford Cemetery in Petersburg. (FindaGrave.com)

References:

  • Allen, Martha Louisa death certificate #1464-136. Ancestry.com. Virginia, Death Records, 1912-2014 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
  • Allen, William Jones, Tombstone, Blandford Cemetery, Petersburg City, Virginia. FindaGrave.com
  • Bell, Landon C. The Old Free State: A contribution to the history of Lunenburg County and Southside Virginia. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1974.
  • Hambrecht, F.T. & Koste, J.L., Biographical register of physicians who served the
    Confederacy in a medical capacity
    . 03/06/2019. Updated 05/07/2019. Unpublished database.
  • Tyler, Lyon Gardner, Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography. New York, Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1915. https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Encyclopedia_of_Virginia_Biography
  • University of Virginia Matriculation Books, 1825-1904, Accession #RG-14/4/2.041, Special Collections Dept., University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.
Posted in A | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment